The Google+ musings of

Philip Durbin

open source geek: greptilian.com
March 15, 2015 1 comments 1 shares 1 plus ones
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"Open Source Design is an initiative – not bound to a specific project or people. People working in this initiative have done design work in open source projects since some time now. This is a movement to first bring everyone together and then see what we can do to improve the open source design community. A lot of this comes down to aggregating and connecting what is already there.

Even initiatives need organization. Looking at the Open Source Initiative it is loose, but it has a real organization. They don't give full editing access to the website to everyone, the question with the Open Source Design Initiative, is who will be the gate keepers and how do they meet to keep things inline with the primary objectives? Trying to get consensus from everyone associated with the objective is an unreasonable expectation.

I would argue that »open source« is not governed by the Open Source Initiative but rather consists of the people who work and make their code open source. Also other parties like Creative Commons, Mozilla, EFF, Github and others are part of that. The OSI is just an institutionalization of that but is really in the background.


There are several parts to this:

1. Connecting the existing open source design community
I think that can not be overstated. There are many of us already, many just don’t know about each other. This works great so far by grouping everyone in the Github organization, in the #opensourcedesign IRC and at the FOSDEM design devroom where some of us were.
Another good way to do this and also raise the profile of open source design is to aggregate the existing blogs of projects and point to their resources. Lots are already listed at: https://github.com/opensourcedesign/resources/blob/master/PROJECTS.md

Let's make a web ring :) – lol :D
I guess the way to go about this nowadays is to really collaborate and make one website/platform.


2. Opening up the design process
Blog about how we work.


3. Connect open source projects and designers
Various ways to achieve this:
For example in the form of an online job board (like the repo at https://github.com/opensourcedesign, or the DesignOpen job board prototype). We also talked with @paulproteus of https://openhatch.org at FOSDEM about improving that site and also having dedicated entry points for designers.
On the job board we should also aggregate the paid jobs offered by companies working on open source like Mozilla, Canonial, etc.


4. Educating developers about design
Because there’s just way more developers than designers in open source, we need to spread our knowledge. This goes from articles / blog posts to longer manuals already listed on https://github.com/opensourcedesign/resources#reads
We could do consulting for example, or specific sprints where we pick one small open source project and all work on improving its design together.


5. Educating designers about open source
Go to design university and do workshops with the students.
Showcase openly licensed resources
* photos like from Flickr’s Creative Commons search
* icons like from thenounproject.com
* fonts like on openfontlibrary.org or theleagueofmovabletype.com – also see the discussion at https://github.com/opensourcedesign/fonts/issues/3
* pointing people to open source tools like Inkscape, Pencil, GIMP, etc
A lot of it is already listed at https://github.com/opensourcedesign/resources


6. Achieving sustainability for open source design
One of the big reasons why designers don’t work in open source is because there’s very little to earn. Even less than for devs, cause there’s not as high of a design standard. We need to collect ideas and find ways on how to make it more sustainable to work as a designer on open source projects. (Crowdfunding, tipping, etc)


7. Create tools that foster and help achive above objectives
(OR: Work to improve
Everyone love usable well crafted tools. Creating valuable tools takes time and resources and effort. These tools, should of course be open source and filter back into the goals of the organization. If this means a more user friendly web IRC client, great. If it means a better invoicing tool that freelancers can use, sweet. Ideally, at some point, development of these free & open tools can be funded the same sustainable way as working on other projects."

via https://botbot.me/freenode/opensourcedesign/2015-03-15/?msg=34204247&page=1

I'll be keeping an eye on http://opensourcedesign.net

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March 03, 2015 0 comments 0 shares 4 plus ones
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"When it comes to hacking on opensource software, none of age, gender, race, country of origin, or how you look matters. All that matters is a pleasant attitude to your fellow developers, a willingness to keep at it and learn as you go, the drive to not give up when things don't go your way, and the ability to tell the difference between an idea and the one who has it."

http://tech.bluesmoon.info/2011/05/story-of-george-ayttms-most-prolific.html

via http://irclogs.jackgrigg.com/irc.freenode.net/openhatch/2015-03-02#i_3586230

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February 22, 2015 0 comments 0 shares 2 plus ones
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February 21, 2015 0 comments 1 shares 1 plus ones
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February 08, 2015 1 comments 0 shares 0 plus ones
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Confessing the sorry state of my audio/video situation to #crimsonfu at http://irclog.perlgeek.de/crimsonfu/2015-02-08

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February 02, 2015 0 comments 0 shares 6 plus ones
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Snowshoes were a reliable way to get to the +Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS)​

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January 31, 2015 0 comments 0 shares 3 plus ones
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https://archive.org/stream/Pitfall_Activision_1982/Pitfall_Activision_1982.bin?module=a2600&scale=2

Many more games are available, which I found via https://medium.com/message/never-trust-a-corporation-to-do-a-librarys-job-f58db4673351 by +Andy Baio

That post is a great read.

"The Internet Archive is a chaotic, beautiful mess. It’s not well-organized, and its tools for browsing and searching the wealth of material on there are still rudimentary, but getting better. But this software emulation project feels, to me, like the kind of thing Google would have tried in 2003. Big, bold, technically challenging, and for the greater good."

Check them out at https://archive.org

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January 04, 2015 1 comments 0 shares 1 plus ones
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My daughter and I threw together a game using +MIT App Inventor​ tonight. It's about how one of our cats is always jumping on the fridge to get away from his brother: http://youtu.be/odEg2TV_gp8

What I'm really excited about is collaborating with +Bryce Durbin​ on the artwork!

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November 15, 2014 0 comments 0 shares 1 plus ones
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+Martin Fowler said, "This is an economic judgment. Several times, many times, I run into teams that say something like, “Oh well. Management isn’t allowing us to do a quality job here because it will slow us down. And we’ve appealed to management and said we need to put more quality in the code, but they’ve said no, we need to go faster instead.” And my comment to that is well, as soon as you’re framing it in terms of code quality versus speed, you’ve lost. Because the whole point of refactoring is to go faster.

And this is why I quite like playing a bit more with the metaphor as the health of a codebase. If you keep yourself healthy then you’ll be able to run faster. But if you just say, “Well, I want to run a lot so I’m therefore going to run a whole load all the time and not eat properly and not pay attention about this shooting pain going up my leg,” then you’re not going to be able to run quickly very long. You have to pay attention to your health. And same with the codebase. You have to continuously say, “How do we keep it in a healthy state? Then we can go fast,” because we’re running marathons here with codebases. And if we neglect that internal quality of the codebase, it hits you surprisingly fast."

http://devchat.tv/ruby-rogues/178-rr-book-club-refactoring-ruby-with-martin-fowler

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July 27, 2014 1 comments 0 shares 0 plus ones
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SQL injection with Havij demo by +Troy Hunt and his three year old via http://www.troyhunt.com/2012/10/hacking-is-childs-play-sql-injection.html via http://www.dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?ShowNum=1005

It looks like http://sqlmap.org is a decent open source alternative: https://github.com/sqlmapproject/sqlmap

As he mentions on the show, SQL injection continues to be widespread: http://cwe.mitre.org/top25/

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